ONC releases first Stage 2 Meaningful Use self-guided education video

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has launched its first self-paced education module on meeting Stage 2 of Meaningful Use, releasing a video on transitions of care and interoperability criteria.

The 16-minute video walks policy researchers and implementers through the requirements for the Meaningful Use objective for transitions of care and the measures, as well as their relationship to electronic health record technology certification. The video outlines the difference between Stages 1 and 2 of Meaningful Use for transitions of care, how to satisfy the measures, different approaches one can use to send the transition of care report to others, applicable exclusions and certification options.

The video also shows what providers do not need to comply with. For instance, it flags that providers do not yet need to comply with National Health Information Network (now called eHealth Exchange) requirements, even though it's in the regulation implementing Meaningful Use, because it does not yet have a governance mechanism. The module also includes hyperlinks for further and more technical resources.

ONC did not explain why it opted to launch its educational module program with transitions of care, but did note that hand-off care is "often problem ridden."   

ONC and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have been trying to make the EHR incentive program relatively transparent and easy to use, providing webinars, videos, worksheets and other tools on registration, attestation, health information exchange, regional extension centers, and other aspects of the program.

A study conducted last fall by the U.S. Department of Defense determined that no one EHR training method was more effective another.

To learn more:
- watch the video
- read the full list of educational programs

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