Lack of funding prevents behavioral docs from adopting technology; National Guard touts benefits of EHRs to Caribbean nations;

> The National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare argues in a recently released report that technology use among behavioral health organizations is low due to lack of financial support for implementing and updating such tools. The report is based on a survey of more than 500 community mental health and addictions treatment organizations. Behavioral providers currently do not qualify to receive Meaningful Use incentives, although a bill introduced to the House of Representatives in late June aims to change that part of the law. Report (.pdf)

> Members of the Florida National Guard's Office of the State Surgeon this week spoke healthcare professionals from five nations interested in adopting electronic health record technology, according to the Florida Guard Online website. The five nations--Dominica, Grenada, Antigua, Barbados and St. Vincent and the Grenadines--all are part of the Regional Security System. The National Guard members touted easy and constant access to patient medical histories as reasons the technology should be used. Post

> The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced 89 new accountable care organizations to participate in the Medicare Shared Savings Program, reflecting the increased adoption and reliance on electronic health records. The program encourages changes in provider infrastructure and requires the use of evidence-based medicine, beneficiary engagement, data sharing, and coordination of care, all of which can best be accomplished via the use of EHR systems. FierceHealthcare

And Finally... My attic contains spider webs; quite a contrast. Article

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