CMS releases proposed quality measures for 2014

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services posted its full set of proposed clinical quality measures (CQMs) for Stage 2 of Meaningful Use April 6, one month after releasing its proposed rules for Stage 2's implementation. That leaves only one month, instead of two, to evaluate the proposed rules for those who want to leave comments.

The proposed CQMs are outlined in tables on CMS' website and contain the measure as well as additional information about each one.

CMS did warn that even now the proposed CQMs are subject to modification. "Some of these measures are still in development; therefore, the descriptions provided in these tables may change before the final rule is published," CMS noted in its announcement.

CMS also said that not all of the proposed measures have been endorsed by the nonprofit National Quality Forum, which is contracted with the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services to help establish a portfolio of quality and efficiency measures for use in reporting on and improving healthcare quality.

The proposed rules require eligible professionals to report 12 CQMs in Stage 2, up from six in Stage 1. Eligible hospitals will have to report 24 CQMs, an increase from 15 CQMs in Stage 1.

The "measure stewards" for the proposed CQMs include The Joint Commission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Committee for Quality Assurance, and the American Medical Association. The industry already has expressed concern that providers may not be able to successfully report certain measures.

CMS invites public comment on the CQMs, which can be submitted online.

To learn more:
- here are the proposed quality measures
- learn more about the National Quality Forum

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