Alleged fraud uncovered during EMR training; Verizon bolstering its healthcare identity services;

> Dr. Juan Domingo, an internist formerly with Lee Physician Group in Florida, accuses his past employer of intentionally defrauding Medicare and terminating him from the practice in retaliation for investigating the alleged upcoding of his colleagues. Domingo discovered something was amiss--by accident, he said--while learning the ropes of his group's new electronic medical record system. FiercePracticeManagement

> Meaningful Use, among other recent health IT initiatives, has made the job of a hospital CIO more difficult than ever, according to a survey conducted by healthsystemCIO.com. Fifty-five percent of the respondents believe that they need more senior IT staff, especially project managers. Commentary

> A National Provider Call to explain the registration and attestation of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs will be hosted next Friday, Sept. 9, by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to Health Data Management. Brief

> Verizon announced today that it is adding new features and capabilities to its healthcare identity services, which will include increased ID standards for accessing electronic health records and health information exchanges. "By streamlining and strengthening the issuance of health identities, our newly enhanced universal identity service for health care will help boost widespread adoption and act as a catalyst for further transformation of the U.S. health care delivery system," Verizon vice president of industry and security solutions Peter Tippett said in the announcement. Press release

And Finally... If you haven't jumped on the iPad bandwagon yet, this might help you change your mind. Article

Suggested Articles

Roche, which already owned a 12.6% stake in Flatiron Health, has agreed to buy the health IT company for $1.9 billion.

Allscripts managed to acquire two EHR platforms for just $50 million by selling off a portion of McKesson's portfolio for as much as $235 million.

Artificial intelligence could help physicians predict a patient's risk of developing a deadly infection.