AHA pushes for prompt finalization of 90-day reporting period for MU in 2015; Newspaper columnist calls EHR program 'money squandered';

News From Around the Web

> The American Hospital Association, in a letter sent June 2 to Acting Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Andy Slavitt, pushes for finalization of the proposed 90-day reporting period for Meaningful Use in 2015 "as quickly as possible." AHA says that even if the rule is finalized by Aug. 1, providers will "have very little time to ... ensure that they meet the revised requirements." Letter (.pdf)

> Washington Post columnist Charles Krauthammer unloads on the Meaningful Use incentive program in a recent commentary, calling the push to adopt electronic health records "healthcare's Solyndra" and the billions invested in the program "money squandered." Commentary

Provider News

> Research has already shown that Magnet hospitals boast better outcomes for patients and nurses, but a new study takes this notion even further, as it found that just the process of applying for the elite status can improve care quality and nurse work environment. Article

Mobile Healthcare News

> Fitness tracker leader Fitbit has refiled for an initial public offering with new documents aiming to raise $358 million given an estimated value of $3.3 billion. Article

Health Insurance News

> Following the publication of Vanity Fair photos with Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as Bruce, transgender issues are being brought up in the health insurance industry as more insurers start paying for gender reassignment surgery, making it easier for this consumer population to access the expensive procedure. Article

And Finally... Where was this woman when I was looking to sell? Article

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