Topic:

Care Delivery

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

More patients open to primary care offered by physician assistants

As the healthcare industry seeks to find ways to address the primary care shortage, a recent nationwide survey finds that patients are more open to care provided by physician assistants.  FierceHealthcare spoke to John McGinnity, president of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, about the profession and how it is set to fill the gaps in healthcare today. 

NIH: Revised guidelines will help prevent Ebola spread in US

Health officials said the revised, stricter guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are more stringent and will help prevent further spread of the Ebola virus, according to  CBS News.  

Readmission reduction: A losing battle?

Hospitals may not be able to reduce preventable readmissions on their own, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Managed Care.

Horizon expands patient-centered care programs

Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey is expanding its patient-centered practices to its newest Medicare Advantage plan. 

Ebola: Legal implications for hospitals, healthcare workers

To find out the legal implications Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas may face in the wake of the latest Ebola-related incidents--and the legal rights of the medical workers who face the greatest risk as they care for patients with the illness-- FierceHealthcare spoke with Karen Evans, R.N., J.D., an attorney with the Johnnie Cochran Law Firm in the District of Columbia.

How ACOs may disrupt patient care

Some doctors worry accountable care organizations may micro-manage doctors and make their care decisions all about cost, Fred N. Pelzman, M.D., writes for MedPageToday.

Obama appoints "Ebola czar"

President Barack Obama may appoint an "Ebola czar" to o help the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention oversee the federal government's response to the deadly virus in the United States, according to  The New York Times.

Malpractice reform doesn't reduce emergency care

State-level malpractice reforms for emergency physicians produced no discernible reduction in the intensity of care, according to a RAND Corp. study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Lax guidelines led to Ebola spread in Dallas

Infection control experts blame lax federal guidelines for the spread of Ebola to two Dallas healthcare workers who cared for the country's first Ebola patient, the  New York Times  reports.

Medical tourism gains steam among Americans

Medical tourism is gaining popularity among Americans, but the practice may not be in their best interests.