News

Obama to send 3,000 troops to help fight Ebola outbreak in West Africa

President Barack Obama will announce an allocation of military and medical resources to combat the deadly Ebola virus' spread in West Africa today, The New York Times reported.

How safety-net ACOs can achieve the Triple Aim

Safety-net accountable care organizations can deliver care that achieves healthcare's "Triple Aim" of better care, improved health and reduced costs, according to a blog post from Health Affairs.

Marketing technique hospitals can use to improve patient satisfaction

In a world where patients and consumers can look up healthcare prices and hospital ratings online, the industry faces increased competition and transparency, and must enhance patient experience to stay relevant, according to a recent Forbes piece.

Nursing career path evolves, now includes care in community settings

As nursing roles change, so do the career paths nurses take with many moving away from the hospital setting to work for home health agencies, ambulatory care centers, long-term care facilities and other places in the community, Nurse.com reported.

82 Illinois hospitals slapped with $16 million in readmission penalties

Eighty-two Illinois hospitals will pay more than $16 million in collective readmission penalties for not reducing their preventable readmissions, the state Department of Healthcare and Family Services announced last week.

Ray Rice fallout fuels healthcare's domestic violence prevention efforts

Fallout over Baltimore Ravens' Ray Rice's assault of his then-fiancee Janay Palmer has renewed the conversation on domestic violence and how various healthcare providers collaborate on programs to aid victims.

Are hospitals safer than ambulatory surgical centers?

The death of Joan Rivers has increased scrutiny of outpatient medical centers and ambulatory surgery centers, according to PBS Newshour.

3 ways your hospital can overcome the nursing shortage

As the demand for nurses increases amid rising patient numbers, aging baby boomers and more individuals covered under healthcare reform, the United States will need to produce 1.1 million new registered nurses by 2022 to fill jobs and replace retirees.

Hospital leaders have personal, professional responsibility for population health management

Healthcare leaders and hospital CEOs have a personal and profession responsibility to lead by example when it comes to preventing and managing chronic conditions like heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes, author Kim Ryan, CEO of Eastside Medical Center in Snellville, Georgia, writes in Hospitals & Health Networks.

Value-based model could improve hospital performance 30%

A value-based approach to hospital operations could improve performance by up to 30 percent, leading major providers like the Cleveland Clinic and Kaiser Permanente to embrace it, according to the Boston Consulting Group (BCG).

Rehab programs let addicted nurses seek help, keep jobs

Up to 15 percent of nurses in the United States have a substance abuse disorder and many states offer programs that allow them to detox without losing their careers, according to Newsworks.

4 ways healthcare workers can improve patient satisfaction

To keep patient satisfaction scores high, hospitals must rely on front-line workers and administrators to interact with patients in the most positive way possible, Global Healthcare reported.

"House call" ambulances save money, unnecessary ER trips

A new ambulance service in Denver relies on "mobile care units" rather than full ambulances to treat patients in need of emergency care, according to Kaiser Health News.

Joan Rivers' death and end-of-life care, informed consent and risk of routine procedures

The circumstances that led to Joan Rivers' death--and whether an error occurred at the outpatient center where she reportedly had an endoscopy to determine what was wrong with her vocal chords--are still unclear, according to the New York Magazine. But the complications she experienced and her death raise important healthcare considerations for hospitals, clinicians and patients.

Peer pressure may improve hand-hygiene compliance

In high school we're told not to give in to peer pressure. But it might be the key to boosting hand-hygiene compliance in hospitals, according to a new study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

Nurses need more respect, stronger voice

Hospitals and healthcare facilities don't give nurses enough recognition, support or appreciation--and the effects are far-reaching, according to an opinion piece in the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Physician "culture of perfection" keeps medical errors high

Reducing medical errors means rethinking a culture that encourages doctors to conceal them, argues a doctor at Bellevue Hospital Center at New York University, according to MedCityNews.

ER visits for high blood pressure rise 25% in five years

The number of patients who went to the emergency room for hypertension jumped 25 percent in recent years, according to a study presented at this year's American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions.

78% of hospitals prescribe unnecessary or inappropriate antibiotics

Widespread use of unnecessary antibiotics increases patient safety risks and leads to more than $160 million in avoidable healthcare costs, finds a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Premier Inc.

Number of C. diff incidents on the rise

Clostridium difficile infections are on the rise and hospitals see the most cases in March, with facilities in the Northeast region of the country more likely to treat the infection, reported MedPage Today