News

Patient early warning detection system reduces mortality rates by 35 percent

Patient early warning detection system alerts staff to minor changes in a patient's conditions can help prevent more serious events down the line and reduce mortality rates.  

Campaign promotes education, credentialing for hospice and palliative care

The Hospice and Palliative Care Nurses Association and two affiliated groups launched a $5 million campaign Monday to train nurses and other professionals to care for patients with serious illnesses.

Texas congressman announces probe of waste in Waco VA

Rep. Bill Flores (R-Texas) pledged a "broad discussion" on the Department of Veterans Affairs' role in mental health research after the revelation that the Waco VA facility wasted millions, according to the Associated Press.

More patients open to primary care offered by physician assistants

As the healthcare industry seeks to find ways to address the primary care shortage, a recent nationwide survey finds that patients are more open to care provided by physician assistants. FierceHealthcare spoke to John McGinnity, president of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, about the profession and how it is set to fill the gaps in healthcare today. 

NIH: Revised guidelines will help prevent Ebola spread in US

Health officials said the revised, stricter guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are more stringent and will help prevent further spread of the Ebola virus, according to CBS News.

 

Readmission reduction: A losing battle?

Hospitals may not be able to reduce preventable readmissions on their own, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Managed Care.

A four-step approach to expand graduate medical education

It is possible to obtain a consensus on how to expand graduate medical education (GME), according to a new Health Affairs post. The article, written by a team of authors led by Richard Rieselbach, professor emeritus of medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, identifies a four-step proposal that they believe can be implemented immediately.

Ebola: Legal implications for hospitals, healthcare workers

To find out the legal implications Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas may face in the wake of the latest Ebola-related incidents--and the legal rights of the medical workers who face the greatest risk as they care for patients with the illness--FierceHealthcare spoke with Karen Evans, R.N., J.D., an attorney with the Johnnie Cochran Law Firm in the District of Columbia.

How ACOs may disrupt patient care

Some doctors worry accountable care organizations may micro-manage doctors and make their care decisions all about cost, Fred N. Pelzman, M.D., writes for MedPageToday.

Obama appoints "Ebola czar"

President Barack Obama may appoint an "Ebola czar" to o help the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention oversee the federal government's response to the deadly virus in the United States, according to The New York Times.

3 ways to boost health insurance literacy

If the average patient's ability to understand medical information is poor, the U.S. public's comprehension of the current healthcare/insurance system is in dire need of improvement. 

Malpractice reform doesn't reduce emergency care

State-level malpractice reforms for emergency physicians produced no discernible reduction in the intensity of care, according to a RAND Corp. study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Lax guidelines led to Ebola spread in Dallas

Infection control experts blame lax federal guidelines for the spread of Ebola to two Dallas healthcare workers who cared for the country's first Ebola patient, the New York Times reports.

California hospital shuts down ORs after patient infections

Orange County, California's third-largest hospital has suspended all elective surgeries after four patients developed infections following orthopedic surgery, according to the Orange County Register.

Medical tourism gains steam among Americans

Medical tourism is gaining popularity among Americans, but the practice may not be in their best interests.

Intolerance of failure blamed for epidemic of overtreatment

Think doctors overtest and overtreat? Blame "intolerance of both uncertainty and error," according to an analysis published online in BMJ.

LGBT advocates: Tie Medicare, Medicaid money to nondiscrimination policies

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is calling on the federal government to require that hospitals receiving Medicare and Medicaid money adopt policies banning discrimination against patients based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

3 ways hospitals can reduce medical errors

A 2013 report found that medical errors may cause up to 400,000 deaths annually, making them the third leading cause of death in the nation, behind only heart disease and cancer. FierceHealthcare examines three ways healthcare providers can reduce and prevent these mistakes.

CDC outlines new Ebola protocol with rapid response teams

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tuesday launched a new strategy to stop the spread of Ebola to healthcare workers in the wake of news that a second clinician who cared for Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan before he died has come down with the deadly virus.

Teeth-whitening Supreme Court case could have larger effect on healthcare

A dentistry-related case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court may have broader healthcare implications, according to National Public Radio.