News

Essential building blocks for patient-centered medical homes

Insurers must implement certain foundational factors to build a successful patient-centered medical home, including strong leadership and staff commitment to the care model, adequate information technology and effective patient engagement tools, reported Health IT Analytics.

Nursing extremes: CA hospital eliminates positions, while Missouri seeks nurse educators

The future of nursing is as unpredictable as ever, with one California hospital eliminating skilled nursing positions, while a shortage of nurse educators leaves Missouri working to recruit more teachers into the profession.

Preventable medical error reporting still lacking in some hospitals

Preventable errors in hospitals still cause hundreds of thousands of death in the U.S. each year, but in some states such as Maryland, the exact number isn't readily available even though hospitals are supposed to report serious medical errors to state regulators an investigative article from the Baltimore Sun revealed.

St. Louis health system may lose doctors over new pay model

Doctors affiliated with Mercy Health in St. Louis are unhappy with the health system's new compensation model and say they may not sign the new contracts, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. 

Fist-bumps, high-fives more hygienic than handshakes

A new study in the American Journal of Infection Control provides further evidence that fist-bumps are a more hygienic alternative to handshakes or high-fives in a healthcare setting.

Sanders, Miller announce tentative VA deal

The chairmen of the House and Senate Veterans' Affairs committees have reached a tentative deal on Veterans Affairs reform legislation, according to the Associated Press.

Union battles, layoff threats make nurses the auto-workers of the 21st century

Just as car manufacturing defined industry in the 20th century, healthcare, which employes one in 10 workers, drives the 21st century, and today's nurses find themselves in the same position as their former auto worker counterparts, according to The Economist.

One dead, two injured in Pennsylvania hospital shooting

A shooting at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital campus in Yeadon, Pennsylvania Thursday left one mental health caseworker dead, a doctor wounded and the suspected shooter critically injured, the Delaware County Daily Times reported.

House, Senate leaders deadlock on VA fix

The leadership of the House and Senate committees on veterans' affairs hit a stalemate Thursday over their respective legislation to aid veterans hurt by the Veterans Affairs scandal, Reuters reported.

Hospitals must address employee fraud reports with procedural fairness

As the government makes it easier for hospital employees to report fraud and quality issues, and as social media gives disgruntled employees an outlet to air dirty laundry, hospitals must work employees to make them feel comfortable addressing concerns internally, Hospitals & Health Networks reported.

How providers can engage, empower patients

As healthcare becomes increasingly patient-centered, providers must engage their patients and empower them to become partners in their own care, argues a Health Affairs blog post.

There's no place for disruptive behavior in healthcare

Has the healthcare industry gone too far in cracking down on disruptive behavior? Is it okay for doctors to be rude, dismissive and act like jerks if they have superior surgical skills? Those are the questions raised this week in an article that explored whether the patient satisfaction movement has gone too far and perhaps, in some cases, disruptive physicians aren't so bad.

Why disruptive docs may not be so bad after all

Has the patient satisfaction movement gone too far? Maybe so, according to Becker's Hospital Review, which calls into question the zerio tolerance approach to disruptive doctors, who may actually be better physicians than their counterparts with good bedside manners.

 

4 pillars for physician engagement

As shifts in healthcare bring a more intent focus on team-based care and coordination, hospitals can boost physician engagement using a framework inspired by the "father of modern sociology," Max Weber, according to an article in Harvard Business Review.

Less-educated workers enter healthcare

The recent surge in healthcare jobs favors positions requiring less education, providing a potential pathway for lower-paid workers, according to a new report from the Brookings Institution.

5 actions that make CEOs' blood boil

There are a few things almost all CEOs really, really hate, according to Forbes contributor Stephen J. Meyer, CEO of the Rapid Learning InstituteTo prove it, he conducted a survey of executives and share the results in his latest opinion piece, hoping to enlighten colleagues and employees about behaviors that drive their leaders crazy.

California nurses' union braces for contract battle with Kaiser Permanente

A California nurses' union will begin bargaining negotiations next week with Kaiser Permanente, the eighth largest health system in the country, on a new four-year contract for nurses at its Northern California hospitals, Kaiser Health News reports.

Standard handoff practices help children's hospitals cut errors

Hospitals can cut handoff-related errors nearly 70 percent by standardizing care transfers during shift changes, according to a study published ahead of print in the journal Pediatrics.

New ACOs organized despite federal scrutiny

Two Arizona health systems are joining together to launch an accountable care organization (ACO) that will provide coordinated care to about 50,000 members, the organizations announced this week, in hopes of improving outcomes, patient satisfaction and cost savings.

Medicare pilot programs waive three-day admission rule for senior patients

Medicare officials piloting experimental programs across dozens of U.S. hospitals want to know if dropping the requirement that limits nursing home coverage to seniors admitted to the hospital for at least three days can reduce costs and improve care, Kaiser Health News reported.