News

Happy Fierce Friday!

While you're digesting your Thanksgiving turkey, please enjoy a collection of some of our favorite features from 2014, including special reports, original interviews and columns you may have...

Ebola epidemic slows down, but public health officials prepare for new threat

​The Ebola outbreak in Liberia is now showing signs of slowing down, but U.S. public officials aren't necessarily breathing a sigh of relief as they now must prepare for the next health disaster, the Associated Press reports.

TX hospital partners with pre-med students to reduce chronic care readmissions

A new care coordination program is yielding positive results for patients with chronic conditions in Texas, according to the Standard-Times.

Watchdog group: Audit California hospitals' adverse events reporting

A watchdog group called on California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) to audit hospitals for medical errors in the wake of a local news report that found details on such events are not readily available.

Reduce nurse fatigue with 40-hour workweeks, no forced overtime

Nurses shouldn't be required to work overtime to cover staffing shortages, the American Nurses Association (ANA) said in a position paper released last week that called for hospitals and nurses should work together to reduce nurse fatigue and possible harm to patients.

Rural healthcare in crisis: What does the future hold?

Rural healthcare providers are at a crossroads. Faced with the same problems as the rest of the industry as it transitions from a fee-for-service model to value-based care, rural providers must also...

Healthcare should focus less on innovation, more on imitation

Hospitals should focus less on innovation and more on imitating proven approaches that actually work and adapt them for industry use, according to a Harvard Business Review article.

Medication adherence: Research finds no easy way to get patients to take prescribed drugs

Half of patients don't take their medications as prescribed, but despite efforts to encourage patients to take the necessary drugs, new research published in The Cochrane Library indicates there is no effective intervention

Older adults sicker in U.S. than other countries

Older American adults are sicker than those in 10 other countries, with nearly seven in 10 dealing with at least two chronic conditions, according to an international survey published in Health Affairs.

Hand-hygiene strategies for healthcare workers--what really works?

The problem of inadequate hand hygiene has persisted in hospitals partly because traditional strategies, such as awareness posters, have "grown stale," while inherent flaws in other initiatives, such as urging patients to remind clinicians to wash their hands, have limited their effectiveness, according to a research article from BMC Infectious Diseases.

Optimize patient flow: The key to reducing readmissions

Despite many hospital's efforts to reduce readmissions, penalties for excessive readmissions reached an all-time high this year. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid will levy fines to 2,610...

Nurses under-report violence, saying it's a "waste of time"

Workplace violence against healthcare workers could be even more prevalent than previously thought, with surveys indicating incidents of violence are massively under-reported.

Keep HIPAA practices in mind in face of Ebola

As the Ebola virus continues to make headlines in the U.S., hospitals must be prepared to protect potential patients' privacy, or face millions of dollars in fines as well as a government investigation, according to an article in MedCity News.

Despite heavy presence in management, women underrepresented as hospital CEOs

Although nearly three-quarters of medical and service managers are women, only 18 percent of hospital CEOs are female, according to an infographic created by Norwich University's Master of Science in Nursing online program.

How California medical errors slip under the radar

Records for hundreds of medical errors that occurred at California hospitals are not readily available to the public, according to an investigation by NBC Bay Area.

Urgent care relieves pressure on ERs, but at what cost?

New York State's Public Health Council is recommending tighter regulations for the rapidly growing urgent care sector, as patient advocates call for a better system for filing complaints about urgent care centers and making clear whether care is coming from doctors or physician assistants, NBC 4 New York reported.

How to Ebola-proof your hospital

​Hospitals have had to improvise in recent months to put together a plan to treat patients with the deadly Ebola virus, and although there is no tried and true model, the Associated Press reveals key principles gleaned from clinics in Africa and the few full biocontainment facilities in the U.S.

NYC official warns public hospitals can't handle uninsured on their own

New York City's richer private hospitals must do a better job of caring for the city's uninsured population, a state health official warned, according to the New York Daily News.

Johns Hopkins releases ethics report for modern-day nurses

A new report from the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics highlights a number of ethical issues facing nurses in the healthcare industry, in the wake of the first National Nursing Ethics Summit at the university earlier this year as well as the world-wide Ebola virus hype.

Report: Florida has worst physician shortage

Despite recent suggestions that concerns about the primary care physician shortage may be overblown, the problem is especially pronounced at the state level, with Florida coming up shortest, according to a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation.